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About the HDMI 2.0 Standards

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

What is new about the HDMI 2.0 standard?

In HDMI 2.0, the biggest improvement was nearly doubling the bandwidth, allowing for up to 4K at 60hz video timing. Additionally, one of the new features was support for 4:2:0 sub-sampling.  This reduces the color information by 75% which reduces the overall data rate by 50%. In other words, support for 4:2:0 allows 4k 60Hz 4:2:0 to be transmitted within the same bandwidth as 4k at 30hz 4:4:4 or non-sub-sampled. On Planar UltraRes, because we do have a very flexible and capable architecture, we were able to add support for 4K at 60Hz 4:2:0 with a firmware upgrade that was made available to customers earlier this year.

Other new features include Rec. 2020 color imagery and this is a new wide gamut color space that encompasses most of the visible spectrum. It was released at a similar time as the rest of the UHD standards and it’s intended that sometime in the future that 4K panels will all have the Rec. 2020 color space, although that is likely to be many years out, probably near the end of the decade (thus the name of the standard 2020, perhaps).

Other features include native 21:9 aspect ratio support. So if, for those of you that have a Blu-Ray® player, you’ll notice that there are black bars on the top and bottom of the signal and that’s actually encoded into the video that’s being transmitted rather than just sending the active area that’s in the middle. So this enhancement allows for the content to be sent at a native wide screen aspect ratio to get higher resolution. You’ll also get 32-channel audio with HDMI 2.0 and it can support up to 4 audio streams, as well.

And finally, one of the new features added has been HDCP 2.2 and this is a new encryption scheme that’s intended to be used for 4K content and so it’s expected that native 4K content that requires encryption will be required to use HDCP 2.2. It’s a more robust scheme than HDCP 1.x.  As you may recall, there was a master key hack on HDCP 1.x which compromised the scheme and they came up with a new more robust revision with enhancements to the overall encryption scheme that allow it to be used in areas other than just HDMI and DisplayPort.

It’s also worth noting that HDMI version numbers don’t accurately reflect the feature set of the products. So merely saying the product is HDMI 2.0 compliant in itself doesn’t say a whole lot because almost every feature within that standard is optional. So for example you could have an “HDMI 2.0 compliant product” that doesn’t support 4K or 3D or deep color or audio or many of the other features for that matter. And so in order to properly reflect the feature set in the product, what really should be said is HDMI with 4K support or HDMI with 3D support or HDMI with 4K 60 4:2:0 support. In most cases when people are asking about HDMI 2.0 support, what they’re really asking is if the product supports 4K at 60Hz.

How does HDMI 2.0 compare with HDMI 1.4a?

DisplayPort 1.3 Standard Updates

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

What is new in the DisplayPort 1.3 standard?

DisplayPort is the digital display interface developed by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA).  It is an interface primarily used to connect a video source to a display device, like a computer monitor or a video wall.  The main feature addition in DisplayPort 1.3 was a 50% increase in bandwidth allowing support for up to 8K at 30Hz. Additionally, DisplayPort 1.3 added support for 4:2:0 sub-sampling like HDMI 2.0 and this provides the ability to support up to 8K at 60Hz 4:2:0. Other features carried over from DisplayPort 1.2 include Multi-Stream Transport or MST and this is the ability to daisy-chain several monitors together in order to be able to drive multiple monitors from a single output, which is a featured aimed at desktop applications, but has too many limitations to be considered a viable video wall feature.
Other features include 3D and audio including HD audio and finally DisplayPort dual mode also called DP++, which allows HDMI to be output from DisplayPort sources via passive HDMI to DisplayPort cable or adaptor. This will continue to be supported but at a reduced bandwidth, only 1080p max. HDCP 2.2 support was also added to stay on par with HDMI 2.0.



We have heard about the USB type C connector that is coming to DisplayPort.  What is it and what are the benefits?

Yes, another related announcement in the standard is the USB type C connector, which is a reversible connector.  This means that the plug doesn’t have to be oriented in one direction.  This may be familiar to those of you who are using the “Lightning” connector on the Apple® iPhone or iPad where you can plug it in to either direction, upside down or right side up.  The USB type C connector is similar. The main benefit of this new connector is not only does it support super speed USB, but through a feature called DisplayPort Alt Mode, it can also transmit DisplayPort video. And it can do this through a passive adaptor. We would expect laptops and other devices to start supporting the USB type C connector probably sometime in 2015.  There will be a variety of cables available, of course, that interface between the connector types.
Comparing the different versions of DisplayPort, how are the capabilities changing as the versions evolve?

Has been DisplayPort been widely adopted?

Since it’s introduction in 2006, we have seen DisplayPort gain popularity in the computer industry.  Predictions from IDC show that DisplayPort will be available on 95 percent of computer notebooks by 2014.  It is still most common as an interface on computers and related equipment and has had limited adoption in consumer devices and sources. OEMs and device makers ranging from Apple®, Microsoft®, Google®, Dell™, Lenovo ® are among VESA members that offer DisplayPort-only products.

Planar Display Screens Connect to Form a Big Seamless Image

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Very few companies in the world can claim Planar’s pioneering legacy in display technologies. From secretive advanced-projects lab that developed the first flat panel displays for laptop computers in the early 1980’s to large displays that plug together like Legos to create big video canvases, Planar has been innovating for decades. 

Here are a few of the technologies that demonstrate innovation:

Planar Clarity Matrix: The potential for a giant display is here today with Clarity Matrix. This tiled LCD video wall system utilizes the latest LED backlight technology, ultra narrow bezel (UNB) panels, and a highly unique architecture of off-board electronics to bring visions to life. Whether customers are using the large screens to watch television or movies, browse the Internet and read email, access network video sources, interface with PCs, and mirror tablets and smart phones, possibly simultaneously – the possibilities are endless. While the largest single display screens in the world today might be 110” or 150”, our customers have implemented Clarity Matrix video walls that measure in the hundreds of square meters. Designed for easy installation and perfect alignment, the Clarity Matrix delivers a virtually seamless image for a variety of applications. The video wall is also available in a MultiTouch configuration, complete with Planar’s proprietary ERO™ (Extended Ruggedness and Optics) feature for enhanced performance. 

Planar Clarity LED3 Rear Projection Displays: These displays run some of the most influential control rooms and situation rooms in the world. The imagery displayed on these video walls help nations make policies, companies make investments, and researchers visualize life-saving and life-changing innovations. Available with integrated processing, Indisys Extensity, the system can make the displays work seamlessly as one giant screen and then allow multiple sources or windows to be displayed simultaneously.

Planar Mosaic: This architectural video wall system allows the combination of several shapes of sizes of displays to create artistic and even sculptural video wall arrays. With the modular pieces, the screen area can be made into different sizes and shapes. From company logos to nature imagery, the uses for Planar Mosaic are numerous. The included video processing allows a non-linear array to work like a single canvas, with the negative space, arbitrary rotation, and even overlapping displays to create a one-of-a-kind statement installations. 

Planar has a strong background in display technology and it shows in our innovations everyday. Hundreds of customers have deployed the systems and you can learn more about our unique and innovative solutions at casestudies.planar.com

News & Events

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Planar, Leyard Expand Award-Winning Clarity Matrix Video Wall Line-up with Extreme Narrow Bezel

21-Jul-2016 - Industry’s smallest seam LCD video wall display features a tiled bezel width of just 1.7mm for virtually seamless installations and Full HD stereo 3D model. Today a..... more ▶

Next-Generation Planar UltraRes Series 4K Displays Deliver the Ultimate Ultra HD Experience

07-Oct-2015 - Best-in-class 75”, 84” and 98” LCD displays offer enhancements in multi-source viewing and 4K video support Planar Systems unveiled the next-generation of it..... more ▶

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